Halloween Read: “Meddling Kids” by Edgar Cantero

Meddling kids

A crack team of animated teen detectives, The Blyton Summer Detective Club, solved their last case thirteen years ago.  Though they caught the culprit (a guy in a costume with an evil scheme), all four of the kids never forgot that terrifying night they spent in a haunted house.

Now young adults, the members of the detective club are not doing so well: Kerri is a bartender with a drinking problem, Andy (deemed too aggressive for the military) has escaped from prison and is on the run, Nate is in an asylum, and Peter has killed himself.  Andy is the one who decides the team has to get back together and revisit the scene of their last case, and put the true mystery to rest at all costs.  That way, she figures, they’ll all be able to move on with their lives.

And it turns out there’s a lot more than just a guy in a mask waiting for them at the haunted mansion.

It’s inventive, original, and funny, with truly creepy scenes, lots of monsters, a suspenseful climax, tons of action, and a great mystery.  It’s like Lovecraft blended with Scooby Doo!

If you like horror that doesn’t skimp on the comedy, give this a read this Halloween!

 

 

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Stephen Gammell & Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

scary stories joke cover

Yeah, that pretty much covers it.

Two years ago I did a Halloween tribute to R.L. Stine’s Goosebumps books.  For many readers my age, Goosebumps was THE scary book series.  There were many imitators, never any duplicators.   R.L. Stine was our introduction to Horror.  That series opened up the gates of scary for us.

Alvin Schwartz and Stephen Gammell pulled the gates the rest of the way open.  And a lot of us have never fully recovered.

Shwartz used ghost stories, urban legends, and even a few creepy songs to create his Scary Stories collections.  All are scary enough on their own.  But it’s the illustrations, oh dear sweet Saint Jerome the illustrations, that will keep you awake at night.  Kids would literally dare each other to look at these when I was in elementary school.  If you could handle Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, you were a tough cookie.

Let’s take a peek into Gammell’s view of mind-bending terror, shall we?

I am so not even kidding you, if you are delicate DO NOT continue reading this post.  If you’re not sure whether to be afraid or not, do a quick Google of “Stephen Gammell.”

Yeah, that’s what you’re in for.  Never say I didn’t warn you.

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