Halloween Read: “The Monstrumologist” by Rick Yancey

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The-Monstrumologist

Presented as a real document found and edited by Yancey, this is a gory and gruesome tale of monsters with a classic feel.

Will Henry is an assistant to a monstrumologist in 1880’s New England.  A group of anthropophagi is discovered in the cemetery near Will’s town of New Jerusalem.  So Dr. Warthrop leads the investigation into how the monsters came to be there, and how to best exterminate them.  Anthropophagi are headless creatures, with faces in their stomachs and brutal strength.  They eat people.

The New England setting adds a layer of cold, dark atmosphere.  The scenes in the churchyard are especially effective, as is the climax deep below the ground.  Will Henry’s complicated relationship with Dr. Warthrop adds a nice dimension to the tale.

Also: when I said gruesome, I meant it.  It’ll make you squirm it’s so gross.  The writing is vivid and the carnage is gory.  The graveyard.  The basement.  The flies.  The worms.  It’s intense, but so beautifully done, and none of it seems out of place.  It just adds to the Gothic horror.

“Enmity is not a natural phenomenon, Will Henry. Is the antelope the lion’s enemy? Does the moose or elk swear undying animosity for the wolf? We are but one thing to the Anthropophagi: meat. We are prey, not enemies.”

Nothing like a good monster story to remind you that human beings are part of a food chain, too.

If you like The Monstrumologist, there are more in the series!  Find out more here.

 

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Marie’s Favorite Scary Books Part VI: Get Freaky

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I used a Creepypasta name generator to come up with this year’s title, as I’m sure countless horror movie screenwriters have done before me.  The title I used is the one that made me laugh first.  (“Marie’s Favorite Scary Books Part VI: Pull My Finger” was runner-up)

I started my creepy reading nice and early this season, so I’ve got a whole bunch of favorite freaky reads for you this time around.  There are some ghost stories, some haunted houses, some cannibals, some crazy VHS tapes, and some cartoon kids solving mysteries.  I think this year’s list covers a broad area of different kinds of Horror, so no matter what your taste, you might find something you like here!

Several of these will have posts of their own this month, so stay tuned!  This list is also up on the Suggested Reading section of the blog, which you can find here.  If you’re the type who must enjoy things in order, you can begin with the very first Marie’s Favorite Scary Books and work your way up.

Marie’s Favorite Scary Books Part VI: Get Freaky

Brother by Ania Ahlborn
It’s obvious fairly early on that this family is a family of cannibals.  But the story is tragic and gruesome and sad, with one of the most downer endings I’ve ever read.

Universal Harvester by John Darnielle
Creepy and weird.  It’s extremely unsettling, particularly if you’ve got a vivid imagination.

The Man in the Picture: A Ghost Story by Susan Hill
A taut and atmospheric tale of revenge.

This House is Haunted by John Boyne
A deliciously old-fashioned ghost story, with shades of The Turn of the Screw.

The Monstrumologist by Rick Yancey
Atmospheric and disturbing, a great tale of monsters and science in the 19th century.

20th Century Ghosts by Joe Hill
A delightful mix of weird fiction and horror, with plenty of truly unsettling images and stories.

Meddling Kids by Edgar Cantero
Scooby Doo meets Lovecraft in this comedy of horrors, all about a crack team of kid detectives who have grown up and have one last mystery to solve.